Specialising in musculoskeletal, orthopaedic, spinal and sports rehabilitation

New Year, New You

The 5 most common Gym mistakes in January

It’s January and the new year brings about the reflection of new year’s resolutions.
This will no doubt involve some sort of new fitness regime
We all know the benefits of regular exercise, but what are the 5 most common mistakes that new comers and those returning to the gym make?

  1. The correct dose of exercise – The Goldilocks principle
  2. Consistency is key – You can’t get fit in one workout
  3. Dynamic Warm up – Save static stretching until the end
  4. Train Movements NOT Muscles – Train the brain
  5. Having a plan to your training – Let your plan be your guide

The correct dose of exercise – The Goldilocks principle

Exercise Prescribers here at Marylebone Physiotherapy, we are experts at getting the dosage of exercise correct for each client. Not too easy as to be ineffective and not too hard as to not be able to walk the next day. Not too cold, not too hot, but just right, is also known as the Goldilocks principle. Exercise can be defined as physical movement that is:

Repeated,

Planned,

Purposeful and

Structured.

We can use the acronym RePPS to help us remember this

Repeating a movement is the very definition of exercise. You learn to master a particular movement, then you load it up with heavier weights or speed up the movement. You can also perform the movement under fatigue.

Planning your exercise is covered later on in this Blog.

Purposeful relates to your specific fitness goals. Remember that weight loss is a side effect of fitness training and not the desired goal.

Structured refers to the way your training session is broken down into its component parts

Below is an example of a typical gym session:

Dynamic Warm up
Strength
Metabolic conditioning
Cool Down
Stretch
Use the RePPS principle for your next session.

Consistency is key – You can’t get fit in one workout

“You can’t drink the Ocean in one gulp!”

It is the same with exercise, you can’t get fit in one workout, just like you can’t live your life in one day.

The first six weeks of training you are unlikely to see any results. However, you are likely to feel better and have more energy. The best things come to those who wait, but in a society that wants instant gratification the wait can be frustrating.

Around 8 weeks the physical transformation becomes visible. We tend to lose body fat and gain lean muscle. Look forward to 12 weeks and things are looking even better

However, you will eventually plateau with your fitness gains and this is where you need to maintain it. Make time for exercise and be consistent.

Dynamic Warm up – save static stretching to the end

If you have not trained since your School, College or University days then things have changed. Wear warm layers and slowly strip them off as your body warms naturally with the heat generated from the movement.

We tend to favour a dynamic warm up in preference to static stretching. We can save that until the end of the workout. Because performing static stretches slows down your heart rate, lowers injury risk and helps reduce DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness) we tend to leave it for after the workout. The other reason for this relates to studies where over stretching muscles in the warm up loses the protective effect of the tendon reflex that is designed to stop over stretching.

Dynamic as the name suggests means we are moving through a movement rather than holding a static posture. This could look like Squats and lunges or Press ups and toe touches. Starting with partial movements and building into full range, listening to the body and not pushing into pain or restriction.

Movement sequences that open the hips and rotate the body and examples of dynamic stretching.

Train Movements NOT Muscles – Train the Brain

Unless you are body building or focusing on particular muscles, then we at Marylebone Physiotherapy would encourage you to train movements not muscles. That’s why we have our own Movement Specialist, Katia.

Movement is a skill, and as such it needs to be practiced and challenged in order to not just make it better, but optimise the movement. The brain knows nothing of individual muscles, it knows only movement.

There are seven level 1 functional movements that you should be familiar with, these are:
Push
Pull
Twist
Hinge or bend
Squat
Lunge
Walking (Gait)

These seven movements form the basis of all functional movements the body has to perform.

Examples of Level 2 functional movements are running jumping and throwing.

Level 3 functional movements are the highest level and these require proficiency at levels 1 and 2 before attempting. Level 3 includes multi-directional movements or combinations of movements linked together.

An example of this is a Burpee.
This is a hip hinge into a press up, back into standing and then performing a jump at the top of the movement. The Burpee is normally completed at speed to add to the challenge of the movement.

Having a plan to your training – Let your plan be your guide

How do you get there if you don’t know where you’re going?

The answer is to have a plan. This will be based on your Fitness goals.

Are you doing a Couch to 5 km or Running a Marathon? Are you starting your first Boot-camp or competing at CrossFit?

Most Gym goers start with a “Push, Pull, Legs” Plan of three times a week

You could train one of the functional movements every day of the week. Or you could break the functional movements up into training each once during the week.

An example might be:

Monday – Push, Twist

Tuesday – Walk

Wednesday – Pull, Lunge

Thursday – Walk

Friday – Hinge, Squat

So, there you have it. The five most common Gym mistakes and how to avoid them happening to you.

Now it’s your turn to implement this new knowledge and have an injury free return to training.

This is your year to get fit, stay injury free and enjoy being healthy.

 

Upcoming TrailMed Event in Velodrome

TrailMed are bringing their Health and Performance Laboratory to London! And there is no better place for it as in our East London Physiotherapy and Sport Medicine clinic in the Lee Valley Velopark.

CardioPulmonary Exercise Testing

Dr Patrick Musto will be conducting Cardio Pulmonary Exercise Testing on Saturday the 23rd February 2019 at the Velodrome.

CPET is a test accurately measuring the funcion of your heart and lungs in response to exercise. The results of the test will give you more information about your health and exercise capacity and allow you to plan your training programs knowing your thresholds.

If that sounds interesting do not hesitate to book yourself in while there are spaces still available! To book yourself in follow the link below.

Book Here

How is the test performed?

TrailMed will ask you to exercise on a bike while wearing a mask to set the protocol. The test will involve gradual increase in intensity of exercise to ensure your heart and lungs are stressed. Your breathing, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation will be recorded and monitored. The more you are able to do, the more information is gained from the test. The whole appointment will take up to an hour including explanations, consent, history, examination and testing. For further details visit TrailMed webpage.

If you are wondering what CPET and what benefits it brings but don't want to get tested yourself, Dr Musto will also be holding a CPET Talk and Demonstration on the same day. Express your interest by contacting TrailMed directly!

Ski Poles…friend or enemy?

There is a body of opinion that recommends not putting your hands in ski pole loops unless you are in fear of losing your poles, for example in deep powder snow, but this has always been a debate.

In the event of a fall, putting your hands inside ski pole loops greatly increases the risk of sustaining a Skier’s Thumb sprain. This common skiing injury is caused when the skier falls and lands on their hand or the ski pole, with the thumb in an extended position, spraining the Ulnar Collateral Ligament of the thumb. This is the ligament located in the web space in between the base of the thumb and the index finger.

This injury is also commonly seen in rugby players and goalkeepers. Immediately after injuring your UCL it is best to rest it for the first few days and apply ice for 15-20 minutes every 2-3 hours. It is wise to seek medical attention if the swelling and pain has failed to settle within the first week as this may be indicative of a more serious injury to the ligament like a partial or complete rupture, and you should rule out any associated fracture. Symptoms may include persistent pain and swelling and a sense of instability around the thumb during pinch activities. Wearing a thumb stabiliser if you have a previous history of this injury may be a good idea.

Happy skiing!

Marylebone Physiotherapist, Alexia Critien, Health Consultants Inc, London, Best Physiotherapist, Musculoskeletal treatment, Acupuncture, Massage, Clinical Pilates, Anti-gravity physiotherapy, Baker Street, Gloucester Place, BNP Paribas, Costa Coffee, Pret a Manger, The Dorset Cafe, Oxford Street, Marylebone train station,

Pilates Principles: Centering

Centering is an important concept in pilates. It comprises of finding your neutral spine and activating your deep tummy muscles to keep your spine in a safe stable position to allow you to move your arms and legs more efficiently. Neutral spine is different for everybody, as it depends on your individual spinal curves. Ideally you should have a small curve in the lower back. To find it you tilt your pelvis back and forth until you find the mid-point of the available range.

Your deep tummy muscles (transversus abdominis) are the only core muscles to attach directly to the spine via some fascia (tough connective tissue). It is thought that in people with back pain, the activation of this muscle is delayed. To activate this muscle imagine that you are drawing in your lower tummy, as if you are trying to squeeze into a tight pair of jeans.

By having a solid centre, you will be able to transmit force and movement through your limbs more effectively

Marylebone Physiotherapist, Alexia Critien, Health Consultants Inc, London, Best Physiotherapist, Musculoskeletal treatment, Acupuncture, Massage, Clinical Pilates, Anti-gravity physiotherapy, Baker Street, Gloucester Place, BNP Paribas, Costa Coffee, Pret a Manger, The Dorset Cafe, Oxford Street, Marylebone train station,

No Pain No Gain!

NO PAIN NO GAIN?

Is the old saying ‘no pain no gain’ true? Is it OK to feel pain after exercise, and how much is too much?

DOMS, or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness can be an uncomfortable reminder that we are not as strong as we thought we were. However, contrary to popular opinion, it can affect anyone regardless of fitness levels. From a couch potato running for the bus, to elite sportsman Andy Murray competing in the grueling heat of the Australian Open, there is no hiding from the beast that is DOMS.

Read More